Kyle Lowry starred at Cardinal Dougherty before moving on to Villanova and the NBA. His mother insisted he stay off the streets.
JERRY LODRIGUSS / File photograph
Kyle Lowry starred at Cardinal Dougherty before moving on to Villanova and the NBA. His mother insisted he stay off the streets.
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The suit, custom-made by Jay Wright’s tailor, hung flawlessly on Kyle Lowry’s sculpted frame, the faintest hint of a white pinstripe easing the harshness of what otherwise would have been a solid black ensemble.

When he emerged from the Memphis locker room for the Grizzlies’ game against the 76ers last month, the injured Lowry accentuated the suit with designer sunglasses and more closely resembled the dapper Jay-Z than the little kid who used to hoist jumpers at the Hank Gathers Rec Center at 25th and Diamond.

While so many other kids in North Philadelphia have failed, Lowry made it. To college. To the NBA. To the bank.

And he never would have gotten there, Lowry said before the Grizzlies traded him to Houston last month, without growing up at 20th and Lehigh.

“Everybody was rough and ragged,” Lowry, who turned 23 years old today, said of his old neighborhood. “It’s tough, but somehow, some way, you find a way.”

As a kid, Lowry saw everything, he said. Drugs. Violence. Homelessness. Abandoned houses. Robberies. But on the playgrounds and in the gyms, Lowry became the embodiment of the North Philly basketball player. Fearless. Stubborn. Tenacious. Resilient.

He said his mother, Marie Holloway, insisted he stay off the streets and on the basketball court, and inside the Gathers Center there is a picture of a 7-year-old Lowry standing stone-faced in a layup line… Read Entire Article Here

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